© meliapond
Site move!

paigereiring-archive:

Hey, guys! Just wanted to let you know that I moved this website. You can follow the blog (same as the old URL) over here.

I just wanted to have this blog on a completely separate account from my personal one so that I can better organize it. Thanks for understanding!

11 months ago  -  4 notes  -  via paigereiring-archive © paigereiring-archive
Site move!

paigereiring-archive:

Hey, guys! Just wanted to let you know that I moved this website. You can follow the blog (same as the old URL) over here.

I just wanted to have this blog on a completely separate account from my personal one so that I can better organize it. Thanks for understanding!

11 months ago  -  4 notes  -  via paigereiring-archive © paigereiring-archive
Site move!

paigereiring-archive:

Hey, guys! Just wanted to let you know that I moved this website. You can follow the blog (same as the old URL) over here.

I just wanted to have this blog on a completely separate account from my personal one so that I can better organize it. Thanks for understanding!

11 months ago  -  4 notes  -  via paigereiring-archive © paigereiring-archive
Site move!

Hey, guys! Just wanted to let you know that I moved this website. You can follow the blog (same as the old URL) over here.

I just wanted to have this blog on a completely separate account from my personal one so that I can better organize it. Thanks for understanding!

11 months ago  -  4 notes

(Source: kimmydesign)

11 months ago  -  8,183 notes  -  via shakesqueers © kimmydesign
Two questions form the foundation of all novels: “What if?” and “What next?” (A third question, “What now?”, is one the author asks himself every 10 minutes or so; but it’s more a cry than a question.) Every novel begins with the speculative question, What if “X” happened? That’s how you start.
—Tom Clancy
11 months ago  -  785 notes  -  via writingbox © writingbox
Let’s talk about romanticizing mental illness/neuroatypicality:

tombtea:

What it is:

  • writing characters with 2D representations of mental illness where the only impact it has on their life and their world is to make them more endearing to the love interest
  • consuming media with the above uncritically
  • treating neuroatypicalities like they’re just quirky and funny and don’t deeply impact a person’s life in debilitating and othering way
  • relating traits like fragile beauty, quiet dignity, etc to people with mental illness
  • using people with mental illness as inspiration porn
  • trying to be a savior and “fix” people or giving shallow advice- you are not a doctor

What it is not:

  • talking about your mental illness
  • coping with mental illness
  • accepting and living with mental illness
  • mental illness as a part of someone’s identity
  • taking medication or going to therapy
  • teenage girls writing posts about how depressed they are (calling this romanticizing mental illness without any more critical analysis reeks of misogyny)
  • having multiple facets of neuroatypicality (example: being bipolar AND having depression)
  • self harm
  • suicidal ideation
  • asking for help

*For the sake of clarity for those who may not know what neuroatypicality means, I am using the term mental illness interchangeably here though I recognize they are not necessarily the same word and that some people, myself included, have strong feelings about the term mental illness.

11 months ago  -  897 notes  -  via fictionwritingtips © tombtea

Sorry, guys! I won’t be able to post a Tuesday Trope article today. I’m on vacation and taking some time away from Florida to visit friends and family in Ohio, so I’ve spent the whole day being social and flitting about. Don’t worry, though! I’ve got some fun things planned for the next month. 

Sorry, again!

11 months ago  -  0 notes

hallowkorg:

happy halloween. its fucking halloween every day from now until the end of october. happy fucking halloween

11 months ago  -  129,253 notes  -  via aominekun © nanokorg-deactivated20140124

When you look at the cover of The Order of the Four Sons, you probably think you’re about to dive into some ancient Egyptian, high fantasy epic with mummies and gods and goddesses and a lot of cats.

Well, you’re not.

It becomes pretty obvious when you read the summary, but neither the summary nor the cover give the potential reader a good grasp on what this book is about.

So let me help you out.

Read More

11 months ago  -  2 notes